Plaid shirt and denim skirt

Plaid shirt and denim skirt Plaid shirt and denim skirt

Archer button up shirt

Archer button up shirt

Sometimes there’s a project that remain unblogged although it was finished for quite sometime, and the reason is not that I don’t like it. It is because I like it so much that it is either being worn or still in the wash. This shirt is such a project! You might recognize the pattern, The Archer button-up shirt by Grainline studio that every sewing blogger seemed to have made.

From the description on the Grainline studio website: “The Archer Button Up is a loosely fitting button up shirt with long sleeves. View A has angled cuffs and a back pleat at yoke. View B has straight cuffs and a gathered lower back detail.” I made view A in size 0 with no alteration.

After making it, I now understand the rave about this pattern. This shirt is not a simple project with stand-up collar, button plackets, sleeve plackets, pockets, and so on, but the instructions are quite clear that I didn’t encounter any difficulty. The patterns are marked correctly and everything matched. It is very frustrating when a pattern is not marked correctly especially when sewing stand-up collar!
Plaid shirt and denim skirt Plaid shirt and denim skirt
Plaid shirt and denim skirt Plaid shirt and denim skirt

Vogue 8697

Vogue 8697

The skirt is actually just finished today. The pattern is Vogue 8697; from the pattern envelope: “MISSES’/MISSES’ PETITE SKIRT: Semi-fitted, tapered, lined skirts A, B, C, D, E, F with shaped waistband, princess seams, back slit, topstitched trim and back zipper. A: contrast waistband. D: contrast sides. E: button trim. A, B, C, D: mid-knee length. E, F: lower calf length.” I made view A in size 10.

Plaid shirt and denim skirt Plaid shirt and denim skirt

The stretch denim was actually leftover from a pair of pants that I cut yesterday (not sewn yet). I didn’t have enough fabric left for the waistband facing so I used different denim fabric that has no stretch. It is actually better because the waistband is supposed to have no stretch. Both the waistband and facing pieces are interfaced. I also inserted rigilene boning to the seamlines of the facing to stabilize the high waistband.
Plaid shirt and denim skirt Plaid shirt and denim skirt

I cut size 10 but then shaved the sideseams considerably so it is probably size 8 now. Other alterations are just the usual shortening on the hip and hem. I didn’t line the skirt per the instructions and only finished the facing edge with grey hem tape.

As I have mentioned, I wear the shirt a lot! It is so simple and versatile. It doesn’t look too table cloth-y anymore as a shirt. I wear it as it is or over t-shirt, with jeans or this skirt. I think these two are quite a perfect match!

Plaid shirt and denim skirt Plaid shirt and denim skirt

Shirt pattern is Archer button-up shirt by Grainline Studio, size 0.
Skirt pattern is Vogue 8697, size 10.

Checker print shirt and green sarouel

Checker print shirt and green corduroy sarouel Checker print shirt and green corduroy sarouel

Celebrate the BoyDo you follow the Celebrate the Boy series at Made by Rae and and Dana Made it? It’s an annual event of posts, tutorials, and inspirations for the boys in your life! This year it has started on February 25, 2013 and will last for two weeks. It’s the perfect time around because Sidra is in need of new outfit as he keeps growing. I’ve been quite busy sewing last week and came up with several pieces.

Checker print shirt Checker print shirt

I found several pieces of different sizes checker print fabric, each in 50 cm (half yard) cut and thought that they would be perfect together for Sidra’s shirt. Several years ago, 50 cm is the perfect length for Sidra’s shirt but not this time. Fortunately the shirt has yoke so the pattern length is juuuust right on the fabric. I was missing a couple mm here and there but they conveniently disappeared into the seam allowance.

The pattern is #13 from a Japanese pattern book,  シンプル&ちょこっとデザイン おんなの子服おとこの子服. I’ve used the pants (here, here, and here) and sleeveless patterns from this book before and was always happy with the result. The shirt pattern is also delightfully wonderful with details like the yoke, tiny pockets, and sleeve tabs.

Checker print shirt Checker print shirt Checker print shirt Checker print shirt

Green corduroy sarouel Green corduroy sarouel

The pants is a sarouel made with green corduroy from my stash. Sidra had been asking me for a sarouel pants lately. He didn’t know the name of this kind of pants, but he pointed to a picture in a fashion magazine and claimed that he wanted a similar one. I have never really thrilled with this sarouel trend but he’s the customer so I promised to make him a pair.

I looked for kid’s sarouel pattern and didn’t found anything. Fortunately all I had to do is just tweeting and several people came up with helpful ideas. Dear Yoshimi pointed me to the right direction, which is a Japanese pattern shop with the name Full of Patterns. It is all in Japanese, but Google translate power gave me strength to browse and confidently ordered a PDF pattern FOP-K09 for kid’s cropped sarouel pants.
Green corduroy sarouel Green corduroy sarouel
The pattern is very easy to sew and fit. It is a sarouel after all so accurate fitting is not necessary. I lengthened the legs a bit and omitted the tab. Sidra looooves the pants. He loves the big pockets, the low crotch, and the comfort. He’s been wearing it the whole week to school and everywhere. I can see that it is very comfortable!

Shirt pattern is #13 from シンプル&ちょこっとデザイン おんなの子服おとこの子服, size 130.
Sarouel pattern is FOP-K09 from Full of Patterns (PDF pattern – Japanese pattern shop), size 130.

Indigo blue corduroy shirt

Indigo blue corduroy shirt Indigo blue corduroy shirt

I bought the corduroy fabric with the thought of making a pair of pants for Sidra. But when I showed the fabric to him, Sidra said that he wanted a shirt from this fabric. His reason? He said, “Everyone would say that this fabric is better as a pair of pants, so I want to be different and use it as a shirt.” You can’t argue with that, can you? So a shirt it is.

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The Henry Shirt

In fact, it was a good opportunity to try my hand on one of the pattern from the Sewing for Boys book that I talked about in my previous post. The Henry shirt is the first project in the book and I really love it. It looks like a simple shirt in a glance, but a closer look reveals more details like the wide pockets, the sleeves and back yoke, and the all-in-one collar. Instead of fabric with different pattern, I placed the corduroy in different direction to create a subtler texture.

I use size 6/7 for Sidra’s shirt. Although he’s 8 years old this year, Sidra is a bit small so the size fits him fine. No alteration was made on the pattern, but I did make a few changes when sewing the shirt.

Only one layer is used for the pockets, instead of doubling the fabric per the instructions. The sleeves/back yoke of Sidra’s shirt is unlined and double- topstitched along the seamlines. I also use double topstitching on the front-to-side and back-to-side seamlines to emphasize the curved lines of the yoke.

Indigo blue corduroy shirt Indigo blue corduroy shirt

Sidra loves the shirt! He likes to wear it over a T-shirt and let the buttons open. “It looks better like this,” he said. I love it too!

Indigo blue corduroy shirt Indigo blue corduroy shirt

Indigo blue corduroy shirt Indigo blue corduroy shirt

Pattern is Henry shirt size 6/7 from Sewing for Boys.

Shot cotton shirt

Shot cotton shirt Shot cotton shirt

Shot cotton shirt

Sleeve detail

A shirt for my husband, made with Kaffe Fasset shot cotton in the color Persimmon. You might remember that I won the Best Top Judges’ Choice for the Spring Top sewalong last May. One of the many prizes is this 2 yards of Kaffe fasset shot cotton in from Pink Castle Fabrics.

Shot cotton has 2 different colors of threads woven together, creating a special color with certain depth. These pictures don’t do any justice as shot cotton fabric is more beautiful when it moves. The Persimmon color that I chose has orange and red threads woven together.

The pattern is my true and tested Negroni pattern that I’ve used about five times now, this time with double pockets and flap. I added a small detail on the sleeve hem, following a tutorial on this Lichen shot cotton shirt by Carolyn. You might even see that the whole shirt is inspired by Carolyn’s shirt, down to the shot cotton and the pockets (^_^;)

The topstitching is orange red, and the thread used for this shirt is one of the 1o4 Mettler thread spools that I won in Burdastyle’s Holiday Giveaway. They are really a dream to sew with! I’ve used them for various projects and still have lots of unused spools. It will take years to use them all!

Shot cotton shirt Shot cotton shirt

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Three red shirts

After the shirt is finished, I just realized that my husband already has two orange red shirts! The other two are store-bought though. Gladly, he still loves this new one, I guess he really likes the color red. My husband told me that he was wrapped in a red blanket when he was taken home from the hospital where he was born, and maybe that is why he likes red. Hmm… I guess so. Anyway, note to myself: do not make more red shirts while these three still last!

Shirt pattern is Negroni from Colette patterns.
Fabric is Persimmon shot cotton from Pink Castle Fabrics.
Tutorial for sleeve hem detail at Handmade by Carolyn.

naniIRO Negroni shirt

naniIRO Negroni shirt naniIRO Negroni shirt

Instead of all the projects I was talking about yesterday, I made another shirt for my husband. I suppose I’m not very good at planning projects.

Anyway, my husband has been wearing his three Negroni shirts almost every day, so I think a fourth one is necessary. The fabric is double-gauze cotton by naniIRO in white with jagged grey stripes. I love how the lines are somewhat irregular and not really straight, a character that shows in almost all naniIRO fabric.

naniIRO Negroni shirt naniIRO Negroni shirt

naniIRO Negroni shirt naniIRO Negroni shirt

Pattern is Negroni from Colette patterns.

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